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Is A 50/50 Time Sharing Good For A Child?

Children are the ones who should be considered first in a divorce or paternity case. There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to determining what is in the best interest of a child. Every family and situation is different. While a 50/50 time sharing solution may be perfect for some families, it may not be ideal for others. Even though most people agree that all children need to spend quality time with both parents, joint custody may not always be best for a child. Parents going through a divorce or possibly a paternity action should focus on their own relationship and the effect it can have on the child. While some children flourish with a 50/50 time-sharing arrangement, there are several circumstances where this is not the case.

Parents Living a Long Distance from Each Other
It would not be fair to a child to have to travel back and forth during the school year to be able to attend a chosen school. It would require the child having to travel much earlier in the morning and would limit participation in after-school extracurricular activities. A child needs a consistent schedule to be able to maintain academic performance. The travel time from one home to the other makes it difficult to get adequate rest and keep up with homework.

Children with Special Needs
A child with autism, ADHD, developmental delays, or a physical or medical condition is easily frustrated by change. It is plausible that one parent works better with the child than the other. Constantly changing the environment is probably not in the best interest of this child. Joint custody is probably not in the best interest of a child with special needs.

Legal and Physical Child Custody
In an Orlando divorce case, the parents can choose a parenting plan outside the courtroom if they can agree. A parent with legal child custody is responsible for making decisions regarding medical care, discipline, religion, and education. Physical custody refers to the location where the child will reside once the child custody decision is made. Child support decisions are usually based on both parents’ ability to maintain a child’s current lifestyle.

Research Results are Inconclusive
Child custody issues have been debated for several years. Much of the psychological research that has been conducted supports that equal time-sharing visitation may be best for some children, but not for all. This arrangement only works when each family devises a schedule that best suits their own current situation. The dynamics of all families are different and requires parents to agree on a parenting plan that is in the best interest of the children. Joint custody and shared custody allow children to have substantial contact with both parents. Child support is not a big issue with parents who work together.

A Family Law Assessment Can Help Determine the Best Custody Arrangement
An experienced family law attorney can offer legal advice for families attempting to negotiate child custody issues in an Orlando divorce. Erin E. Morse and her competent staff handle all issues that may arise with a couple going through an Orlando divorce. She can explain the benefits of having two parents who are involved in their children’s lives on a daily basis. Shared custody or joint custody allows parents to e share the responsibility for raising the children equally. As a family law attorney, Erin E. Morse helps families make the tough decisions that must be addressed after an Orlando divorce. Issues such as child support and visitation schedules require sensitivity and empathy when determining what is best for children. Joint custody is all about positive co-parenting and is the answer for many; however, it may not be the answer if one parent is more involved with the children than the other one.

The holidays are supposed to be a joyful time of year spent with loved ones. Some families have a little more stress during this season, however. Split families have to share child custody during the holidays. This can be a stressful situation for parents to decide on and, with some many emotions involved, may require help from an Orlando divorce attorney.

With the holidays quickly approaching, now is the time to begin working out a time sharing and visitation schedule for child custody during the holidays. By getting it all figured out now, it can prevent unnecessary stress, confusion, and arguments with the other parent when the time comes. Even if you have joint custody or pay child support, you still need to have a holiday schedule in place.

When the courts become involved in a child custody or Orlando divorce case, the judge almost always grants joint custody or shared custody of the child. This means shared holidays, too. The only time this isn’t the case is when the judge believes it would be detrimental to the child to have to spend more time with a certain parent.

How to Split Child Custody During the Holidays

Most often, a judge will split time during the holidays so that both parents are able to spend an adequate amount of time with the child. This usually means that the judge will grant some kind of time sharing order to the parents that is different than their normal joint custody schedule.

The child custody agreement will likely be different during the holidays than during the rest of the year. Even if the parents have joint custody, one parent pays child support, or one parent only gets one weekend a month, the agreement during the holidays will probably be different.

The two parents can decide how to split up the holidays themselves, but sometimes there will be a disagreement. When this happens, the courts typically have to get involved to make sure that the shared custody schedule is fair for the holidays.

There are a couple different ways that you could split up holidays. One method may work better for your family than the other method, so it is important to think all factors through before deciding. Orlando divorce courts do what they think is best for the child, so if you and your child’s other parent can come to a fair agreement, it is one less step to do in court. The different options include:

  • Switch holidays every other year

One parent would have the child on Christmas in 2018, and the other parent would get to spend Christmas of 2019 with the child. You would do this for every holiday. If you choose to divide up visitation this way, you won’t have to miss seeing your child on a holiday for two years in a row.

  • Split the holiday in half

One parent will get the child in the morning, and the other parent will get to have the child for the rest of the day. This option requires the most planning because you will have to figure in traveling. If you live far from the other parent, a portion of your child’s holiday will be spent traveling, and that isn’t always best.

  • Have the same scheduled holiday every year

This would mean that the parent who gets Christmas gets it every year, and the other parent never gets to spend Christmas with the child. This is important to think about, as well, because both parents will have to sacrifice some of the holidays.

Final Thoughts on Sharing Parenting Time During the Holidays

Both parents want to spend the holidays with their child, but in the case of Orlando divorce, parents are required to split the holidays in some way. If you are struggling to set up a joint custody or child support agreement during the holidays, an Orlando divorce attorney might be the way to go.